Four Major Functions Provided by a Real Estate Agent That You Can Do Yourself

Selling a home entails four major functions that are usually performed by a real estate agent. If we take the mystery out of those functions, they start looking as if we can do them without an agent. And you can!

1. Pricing your property

The first thing that an agent will do for you is help price your property. You don’t want to offer your home for sale at double its market value because it just won’t sell. Likewise, you don’t want to offer your home for sale at half its market value because you would just be cheating yourself of that price difference. If the market is such that your house in your neighborhood in your city is worth about $200,000 then you want to sell it for that. If you have made additions to the house that might make it worth more, then you want to add those items to it. The real estate agent has a lot of that data at their fingertips through their subscriptions and through their knowledge of the marketplace.

You can do this pricing yourself as long as you don’t let your ego get the better of common sense. You can find out what homes are selling for by cruising your neighborhood and checking out homes for sale to see what they are priced at. You can check to see what they sold for by visiting your tax authorities. Most municipalities and counties require that all deed transfers be recorded as a matter of public record. You can access that data through the internet if your municipality offers it, or you can go look it up in person where the internet is not used. Just make sure you are pricing your 3 bedroom 2 bath house with other 3 bedroom 2 bath houses rather than a 2 bedroom or 5 bedroom house.

2. Marketing your property

Marketing real estate is a sort of catch-all word for advertising the home as being for sale and then showing the property to prospective buyers through appointments or open-houses. The most important and probably most costly marketing activity is advertising the house. There is one real estate agent around here that states in their commercials that they spend between $1,000 and $1,500 per HOUSE while claiming that many agents only spend less than $500 per month for all of the houses that they list.

You can perform all 3 of these marketing functions. Who would be better to show a home or to have an open-house than the resident of the home — just do not let your ego get in the way and react defensively to reasonable buying questions. The advertising should be fairly simple as well. You are just as qualified to create want-ads for your local and regional papers and classified magazines as long as you model your ads after the ones that you will be competing for attention with. There are some advertising sites that require that all of their advertisers be real estate agents. You might try circumventing that restriction by offering a real estate agent a small fee to list your property on those restricted sites. The worse they can do is say “No” and a different agent might be more cooperative.

3. Contract exchange and negotiation.

Real estate agents act as intermediaries between the seller and the buyer. They take a contract proposal from the prospective buyer or their agent and present it to the seller. This goes on with price changes or with feature additions and removals until both the seller and the buyer agree on the selling price and property conditions.

There should be no question that you can do this yourself as the seller. After all, the agent would have to come to you anyway to get your approval and signature. Once again, this is where you need to put your ego and pride to the side. At this stage, all of your advertising and pricing work has come to fruition and you have a buyer negotiating with you. The worse thing you could do is to react defensively. You just participate in a give and take during the process as if it were for someone else.

4. Preparing the final paperwork and closing the sale

The real estate agent is usually the one to give all of the closing information to the title company and lawyers so that the deed to the property can be transferred from the seller to the buyer with no problems. This is when checks are transferred and mortgages paid off. It is also when the commission check is given to the real estate broker for dispersal to his agent.

You can do these things also. You are the one that has handled the paperwork up to now. You are the one that is ready for your mortgage to be paid off. You are the one ready to receive a check for the difference between what you owe on the mortgage and the selling price of the house. Most of this information is put on the HUD-1 form by the title company. In fact the major role of the agent here is to hold your hand and collect the commission check. Again, these tasks can be handled with a minimum of activity on your part. Any legal requirements can be farmed out to a lawyer for a much smaller fee than the agent’s commission.

Pricing, marketing, negotiating, and closing are all functions that are required to sell a property. They are all tasks normally handled by a real estate agent. They are also tasks that you can do yourself at a cost far less than 5% of the selling price of your house.

Things I Have Learnt About Prospecting and Cold Calling in Commercial Real Estate

In any real estate market and economy, the prospecting process remains fundamentally important to the success of the real estate agent and individual salesperson. Prospecting on a daily basis is the key to progress and success with both territory control and domination.

Here are some key facts that I have learned from prospecting and cold calling over the years:

  1. Most people working in the industry rank very poorly when it comes to prospecting on a regular basis. This is a significant opportunity for those that get their prospecting model under control.
  2. Face to face contact remains the ultimate conversion factor when it comes to prospecting. Everything you do should point towards a successful introductory meeting with the qualified parties.
  3. The telephone is a very powerful tool for creating meetings and contact with the right people. The cold calling process you use must be consistent and professional. Gone are the days of sleazy sales pitches.
  4. One of the more successful traditional methods of marketing that has been around for years is the signboard. The more signboards you get into your territory, the more momentum and ease you will have with building listing and sales opportunity. The signboard infers that you have market presence and domination. That is what the local community and property investors think, providing you have a good number of signboards placed on quality property throughout the area.
  5. E-mail marketing and database use is now critical to both the individual salesperson and the real estate agency office. It remains a tool of constant contact of relevant property information to qualified prospects. These are people that already know you and expect information and property updates from time to time. Growing and shaping the database each day from personal contact across the sales team is fundamental to progress and market share.
  6. Some less experienced salespeople tend to rely on E mail as the first and final point of contact. The process of Email is convenient and easy to use, however it has little benefit in prospecting and will not replace the benefit of one to one contact. If the prospect does not respond to the Email, a typical salesperson will usually discard and forget the prospect. The reality of the prospecting emails that you send is that most of them are deleted and discarded.

Prospecting for commercial real estate listing opportunity should be based around unique and personal contact. The more that local people know you personally as a professional and knowledgeable real estate expert, the more listings you will achieve. This image and mantle takes time to develop but it will occur through diligent personal contact.

Fashion Shopping For Tall Ladies

Shopping for a tall lady, 5’9″ and up, is a difficult task. You have to consider the inseam on slacks and jeans, the length of sleeves and where the waistline falls. Being 5’10”, I am notorious for taking the hem out of pants.

Places NOT to shop:

When shopping for pants that cater to taller women, you want to stray away from Bebe, Victoria Secret, Metro Style, Macys,Dillards, and Banana Republic. Trust me. I have tried slacks from ALL of the stores above and none of them quite seem long enough. Every now and again Bebe, which caters to petites, will carry a pair of slacks with an inseam greater than 33 inches.

Where TO shop:

When shopping for slacks and you are tall. The internet is your friend. While the selection of tall slacks in stores such as Banana Republic and Ann Taylor may be limited, these stores offer longer inseams when shopping online. J Crew is another store that offers a great tall selection online. If you would like to walk into a store for slacks, The Gap, Express and New York and Company carry longer lengths in slacks.

Denim

When shopping for denim jeans for tall ladies, the same stores listed above will work. However, if you are into designer denim, you would want to learn which brands cater to tall ladies. Rock and Republic and Seven of all Mankind have longer inseams. When shopping for denim for someone 5’9″ or over, you would want to look for a 34 inch inseam. Designer denim brands like True Religion and Citizens of Humanity, cater to shorter ladies.

The Benefits of E-Cigarettes and Where to Find Them

Considering the fact that many people try everything to quit smoking, it’s no wonder that smokeless cigarettes are becoming a popular method of addiction treatment. These revolutionary new devices actually mimic real cigarettes. However, they do not contain all of the harmful chemicals inside of them and they do not give off that tobacco odor that is so known to cling to fabrics and hair. Those who choose to Buy Smokeless Cigarettes will definitely benefit from taking a more Uncategorized approach to quitting as opposed to using harsh patches and pills.

When you Buy Smokeless Cigarettes and fill them up with the designated E-Juice, you can literally smoke your cigarette anywhere. That’s because it does not give off any odors, so you won’t have to worry about people complaining about the smell. The electronic cigarette only gives off a steam vapor, which looks like real smoke without any of the harmful side effects. You will even be able to Buy Smokeless Cigarettes and use them while shopping at the mall or going out to eat in a restaurant. It truly is a fantastic way of kicking the habit while also enabling you to still feel like you are a smoker, despite lacking all of the health problems.

Once you Buy Electronic Cigarettes you will need to fill the device with E-Juice. This E-Juice is what aids in your quitting. Despite the fact that the e-cigarette looks and feels like the real thing, it also tastes like the real thing with the specially formulated E-Juice that is added to it. There are many different flavors of E-Juice that are all tempting in their own nature and you can choose whichever flavor you would like in order to get that same euphoric feeling that you are so used to when you use electric cigarettes.

E Cigs come in a variety of different starter kits that will get you going on the path of being a nonsmoker. What’s more, when you Buy Smokeless Cigarettes you will also be able to look for e-liquid and refill cartridges for them. The best way to kick the habit is to still feel like you are doing it on a regular basis, and that is why smoke-free cigarettes are so popular worldwide. Choosing to Buy Smokeless Cigarettes will enable you to begin living your life healthier and it will also protect the health of people who happen to be around you on a regular basis who may have been affected by the second hand smoke. E Cigarettes open up new possibilities within your life.

If you’ve tried everything imaginable to quit smoking or you know someone who has you may want to buy some smokeless cigarettes. Many consumer reports show e-cigarettes fill a gap where other products fail. Dr’s are recommending them to clients more than ever and people are quitting easier than before. E-cigarette510.com is also filling a gap where consumers can safely buy smokeless cigarettes without fear of being over charged or have bait and switch tactics used like so many other websites.

Home Buyers and Sellers Real Estate Glossary

Every business has it’s jargon and residential real estate is no exception. Mark Nash author of 1001 Tips for Buying and Selling a Home shares commonly used terms with home buyers and sellers.

1031 exchange or Starker exchange: The delayed exchange of properties that qualifies for tax purposes as a tax-deferred exchange.

1099: The statement of income reported to the IRS for an independent contractor.

A/I: A contract that is pending with attorney and inspection contingencies.

Accompanied showings: Those showings where the listing agent must accompany an agent and his or her clients when viewing a listing.

Addendum: An addition to; a document.

Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM): A type of mortgage loan whose interest rate is tied to an economic index, which fluctuates with the market. Typical ARM periods are one, three, five, and seven years.

Agent: The licensed real estate salesperson or broker who represents buyers or sellers.

Annual percentage rate (APR): The total costs (interest rate, closing costs, fees, and so on) that are part of a borrower’s loan, expressed as a percentage rate of interest. The total costs are amortized over the term of the loan.

Application fees: Fees that mortgage companies charge buyers at the time of written application for a loan; for example, fees for running credit reports of borrowers, property appraisal fees, and lender-specific fees.

Appointments: Those times or time periods an agent shows properties to clients.

Appraisal: A document of opinion of property value at a specific point in time.

Appraised price (AP): The price the third-party relocation company offers (under most contracts) the seller for his or her property. Generally, the average of two or more independent appraisals.

“As-is”: A contract or offer clause stating that the seller will not repair or correct any problems with the property. Also used in listings and marketing materials.

Assumable mortgage: One in which the buyer agrees to fulfill the obligations of the existing loan agreement that the seller made with the lender. When assuming a mortgage, a buyer becomes personally liable for the payment of principal and interest. The original mortgagor should receive a written release from the liability when the buyer assumes the original mortgage.

Back on market (BOM): When a property or listing is placed back on the market after being removed from the market recently.

Back-up agent: A licensed agent who works with clients when their agent is unavailable.

Balloon mortgage: A type of mortgage that is generally paid over a short period of time, but is amortized over a longer period of time. The borrower typically pays a combination of principal and interest. At the end of the loan term, the entire unpaid balance must be repaid.

Back-up offer: When an offer is accepted contingent on the fall through or voiding of an accepted first offer on a property.

Bill of sale: Transfers title to personal property in a transaction.

Board of REALTORS® (local): An association of REALTORS® in a specific geographic area.

Broker: A state licensed individual who acts as the agent for the seller or buyer.

Broker of record: The person registered with his or her state licensing authority as the managing broker of a specific real estate sales office.

Broker’s market analysis (BMA): The real estate broker’s opinion of the expected final net sale price, determined after acquisition of the property by the third-party company.

Broker’s tour: A preset time and day when real estate sales agents can view listings by multiple brokerages in the market.

Buyer: The purchaser of a property.

Buyer agency: A real estate broker retained by the buyer who has a fiduciary duty to the buyer.

Buyer agent: The agent who shows the buyer’s property, negotiates the contract or offer for the buyer, and works with the buyer to close the transaction.

Carrying costs: Cost incurred to maintain a property (taxes, interest, insurance, utilities, and so on).

Closing: The end of a transaction process where the deed is delivered, documents are signed, and funds are dispersed.

CLUE (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange): The insurance industry’s national database that assigns individuals a risk score. CLUE also has an electronic file of a properties insurance history. These files are accessible by insurance companies nationally. These files could impact the ability to sell property as they might contain information that a prospective buyer might find objectionable, and in some cases not even insurable.

Commission: The compensation paid to the listing brokerage by the seller for selling the property. A buyer may also be required to pay a commission to his or her agent.

Commission split: The percentage split of commission compen-sation between the real estate sales brokerage and the real estate sales agent or broker.

Competitive Market Analysis (CMA): The analysis used to provide market information to the seller and assist the real estate broker in securing the listing.

Condominium association: An association of all owners in a condominium.

Condominium budget: A financial forecast and report of a condominium association’s expenses and savings.

Condominium by-laws: Rules passed by the condominium association used in administration of the condominium property.

Condominium declarations: A document that legally establishes a condominium.

Condominium right of first refusal: A person or an association that has the first opportunity to purchase condominium real estate when it becomes available or the right to meet any other offer.

Condominium rules and regulation: Rules of a condominium association by which owners agree to abide.

Contingency: A provision in a contract requiring certain acts to be completed before the contract is binding.

Continue to show: When a property is under contract with contingencies, but the seller requests that the property continue to be shown to prospective buyers until contingencies are released.

Contract for deed: A sales contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property but the seller holds title until the loan is paid. Also known as an installment sale contract.

Conventional mortgage: A type of mortgage that has certain limitations placed on it to meet secondary market guidelines. Mortgage companies, banks, and savings and loans underwrite conventional mortgages.

Cooperating commission: A commission offered to the buyer’s agent brokerage for bringing a buyer to the selling brokerage’s listing.

Cooperative (Co-op): Where the shareholders of the corporation are the inhabitants of the building. Each shareholder has the right to lease a specific unit. The difference between a co-op and a condo is in a co-op, one owns shares in a corporation; in a condo one owns the unit fee simple.

Counteroffer: The response to an offer or a bid by the seller or buyer after the original offer or bid.

Credit report: Includes all of the history for a borrower’s credit accounts, outstanding debts, and payment timelines on past or current debts.

Credit score: A score assigned to a borrower’s credit report based on information contained therein.

Curb appeal: The visual impact a property projects from the street.

Days on market: The number of days a property has been on the market.

Decree: A judgment of the court that sets out the agreements and rights of the parties.

Disclosures: Federal, state, county, and local requirements of disclosure that the seller provides and the buyer acknowledges.

Divorce: The legal separation of a husband and wife effected by a court decree that totally dissolves the marriage relationship.

DOM: Days on market.

Down payment: The amount of cash put toward a purchase by the borrower.

Drive-by: When a buyer or seller agent or broker drives by a property listing or potential li
sting.

Dual agent: A state-licensed individual who represents the seller and the buyer in a single transaction.

Earnest money deposit: The money given to the seller at the time the offer is made as a sign of the buyer’s good faith.

Escrow account for real estate taxes and insurance: An account into which borrowers pay monthly prorations for real estate taxes and property insurance.

Exclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are excluded from the contract or offer to purchase.

Expired (listing): A property listing that has expired per the terms of the listing agreement.

Fax rider: A document that treats facsimile transmission as the same legal effect as the original document.

Feedback: The real estate sales agent and/or his or her client’s reaction to a listing or property. Requested by the listing agent.

Fee simple: A form of property ownership where the owner has the right to use and dispose of property at will.

FHA (Federal Housing Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee by the FHA that a percentage of a loan will be underwritten by a mortgage company or banker.

Fixture: Personal property that has become part of the property through permanent attachment.

Flat fee: A predetermined amount of compensation received or paid for a specific service in a real estate transaction.

For sale by owner (FSBO): A property that is for sale by the owner of the property.

Gift letter: A letter to a lender stating that a gift of cash has been made to the buyer(s) and that the person gifting the cash to the buyer is not expecting the gift to be repaid. The exact wording of the gift letter should be requested of the lender.

Good faith estimate: Under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, within three days of an application submission, lenders are required to provide in writing to potential borrowers a good faith estimate of closing costs.

Gross sale price: The sale price before any concessions.

Hazard insurance: Insurance that covers losses to real estate from damages that might affect its value.

Homeowner’s insurance: Coverage that includes personal liability and theft insurance in addition to hazard insurance.

HUD/RESPA (Housing and Urban Development/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act): A document and statement that details all of the monies paid out and received at a real estate property closing.

Hybrid adjustable rate: Offers a fixed rate the first 5 years and then adjusts annually for the next 25 years.

IDX (Internet Data Exchange): Allows real estate brokers to advertise each other’s listings posted to listing databases such as the multiple listing service.

Inclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are included in a contract or offer to purchase.

Independent contractor: A real estate sales agent who conducts real estate business through a broker. This agent does not receive salary or benefits from the broker.

Inspection rider: Rider to purchase agreement between third party relocation company and buyer of transferee’s property stating that property is being sold “as is.” All inspection reports conducted by the third party company are disclosed to the buyer and it is the buyer’s duty to do his/her own inspections and tests.

Installment land contract: A contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property while the seller retains the title to the property until the loan is paid.

Interest rate float: The borrower decides to delay locking their interest rate on their loan. They can float their rate in expectation of the rate moving down. At the end of the float period they must lock a rate.

Interest rate lock: When the borrower and lender agree to lock a rate on loan. Can have terms and conditions attached to the lock.

List date: Actual date the property was listed with the current broker.

List price: The price of a property through a listing agreement.

Listing: Brokers written agreement to represent a seller and their property. Agents refer to their inventory of agreements with sellers as listings.

Listing agent: The real estate sales agent that is representing the sellers and their property, through a listing agreement.

Listing agreement: A document that establishes the real estate agent’s agreement with the sellers to represent their property in the market.

Listing appointment: The time when a real estate sales agent meets with potential clients selling a property to secure a listing agreement.

Listing exclusion: A clause included in the listing agreement when the seller (transferee) lists his or her property with a broker.

Loan: An amount of money that is lent to a borrower who agrees to repay the amount plus interest.

Loan application: A document that buyers who are requesting a loan fill out and submit to their lender.

Loan closing costs: The costs a lender charges to close a borrower’s loan. These costs vary from lender to lender and from market to market.

Loan commitment: A written document telling the borrowers that the mortgage company has agreed to lend them a specific amount of money at a specific interest rate for a specific period of time. The loan commitment may also contain conditions upon which the loan commitment is based.

Loan package: The group of mortgage documents that the borrower’s lender sends to the closing or escrow.

Loan processor: An administrative individual who is assigned to check, verify, and assemble all of the documents and the buyer’s funds and the borrower’s loan for closing.

Loan underwriter: One who underwrites a loan for another. Some lenders have investors underwrite a buyer’s loan.

Lockbox: A tool that allows secure storage of property keys on the premises for agent use. A combo uses a rotating dial to gain access with a combination; a Supra® (electronic lockbox or ELB) features a keypad.

Managing broker: A person licensed by the state as a broker who is also the broker of record for a real estate sales office. This person manages the daily operations of a real estate sales office.

Marketing period: The period of time in which the transferee may market his or her property (typically 45, 60, or 90 days), as directed by the third-party company’s contract with the employer.

Mortgage banker: One who lends the bank’s funds to borrowers and brings lenders and borrowers together.

Mortgage broker: A business that or an individual who unites lenders and borrowers and processes mortgage applications.

Mortgage loan servicing company: A company that collects monthly mortgage payments from borrowers.

Multiple listing service (MLS): A service that compiles available properties for sale by member brokers.

Multiple offers: More than one buyers broker present an offer on one property where the offers are negotiated at the same time.

National Association of REALTORS® (NAR): A national association comprised of real estate sales agents.

Net sales price: Gross sales price less concessions to the buyers.

Off market: A property listing that has been removed from the sale inventory in a market. A property can be temporarily or permanently off market.

Offer to purchase: When a buyer proposes certain terms and presents these terms to the seller.

Office tour/caravan: A walking or driving tour by a real estate sales office of listings represented by agents in the office. Usually held on a set day and time.

Parcel identification number (PIN): A taxing authority’s tracking number for a property.

Pending: A real estate contract that has been accepted on a property but the transaction has not closed.

Personal assistant: A real estate sales agent administrative assistant.

Planned unit development (PUD): Mixed-use development that sets aside areas for residential use, commercial use, and public areas such as schools, parks, and so on.

Preapproval: A higher level of buyer/borrower prequalification required by a mortgage lender. Some preapprovals have conditions the borrowe
r must meet.

Prepaid interest: Funds paid by the borrower at closing based on the number of days left in the month of closing.

Prepayment penalty: A fine imposed on the borrower by the lender when the loan is paid off before it comes due.

Prequalification: The mortgage company tells a buyer in advance of the formal mortgage application, how much money the borrower can afford to borrow. Some prequalifications have conditions that the borrower must meet.

Preview appointment: When a buyer’s agent views a property alone to see if it meets his or her buyer’s needs.

Pricing: When the potential seller’s agent goes to the potential listing property to view it for marketing and pricing purposes.

Principal: The amount of money a buyer borrows.

Principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI): The four parts that make up a borrower’s monthly mortgage payment. Private mortgage insurance (PMI): A special insurance paid by a borrower in monthly installments, typically of loans of more than 80 percent of the value of the property.

Professional designation: Additional nonlicensed real estate education completed by a real estate professional.

Professional regulation: A state licensing authority that oversees and disciplines licensees.

Promissory note: A promise-to-pay document used with a contract or an offer to purchase.

R & I: Estimated and actual repair and improvement costs.

Real estate agent: An individual who is licensed by the state and who acts on behalf of his or her client, the buyer or seller. The real estate agent who does not have a broker’s license must work for a licensed broker.

Real estate contract: A binding agreement between buyer and seller. It consists of an offer and an acceptance as well as consideration (i.e., money).

REALTOR®: A registered trademark of the National Association of REALTORS® that can be used only by its members.

Release deed: A written document stating that a seller or buyer has satisfied his or her obligation on a debt. This document is usually recorded.

Relist: Property that was listed with another broker but relisted with a current broker.

Rider: A separate document that is attached to a document in some way. This is done so that an entire document does not need to be rewritten.

Salaried agent: A real estate sales agent or broker who receives all or part of his or her compensation in real estate sales in the form of a salary.

Sale price: The price paid for a listing or property.

Seller (owner): The owner of a property who has signed a listing agreement or a potential listing agreement.

Showing: When a listing is shown to prospective buyers or the buyer’s agent (preview).

Special assessment: A special and additional charge to a unit in a condominium or cooperative. Also a special real estate tax for improvements that benefit a property.

State Association of REALTORS®: An association of REALTORS® in a specific state.

Supra®: An electronic lockbox (ELB) that holds keys to a property. The user must have a Supra keypad to use the lockbox.

Temporarily off market (TOM): A listed property that is taken off the market due to illness, travel, needed repairs, and so on.

Temporary housing: Housing a transferee occupies until permanent housing is selected or becomes available.

Transaction: The real estate process from offer to closing or escrow.

Transaction management fee (TMF): A fee charged by listing brokers to the seller as part of the listing agreement.

Transaction sides: The two sides of a transaction, sellers and buyers. The term used to record the number of transactions in which a real estate sales agent or broker was involved during a specific period.

24-hour notice: Allowed by law, tenants must be informed of showing 24 hours before you arrive.

Under contract: A property that has an accepted real estate contract between seller and buyer.

VA (Veterans Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee on a mortgage amount backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Virtual tour: An Internet web/cd-rom-based video presentation of a property.

VOW’s (Virtual Office web sites): An Internet based real estate brokerage business model that works with real estate consumers in same way as a brick and mortar real estate brokerage.

W-2: The Internal Revenue form issued by employer to employee to reflect compensation and deductions to compensation.

W-9: The Internal Revenue form requesting taxpayer identification number and certification.

Walk-through: A showing before closing or escrow that permits the buyers one final tour of the property they are purchasing.

Will: A document by which a person disposes of his or her property after death.

Shopping For Mobile Phones – Why So Popular Online?

Mobile phone shopping in today’s market is a difficult task in the sense that one has to choose from a variety of handsets with a hundred different features. One who is adept at handling a mobile knows that mobile features are upgraded every day. So he should keep in track with what is cooking in the world of mobile phones.

Mobile shopping has become very popular due to its affordability and accessibility. Today the mobile market is buzzing with phones that are not only affordable but comes along with many features as well. Camera phones are available at a very cheap range. One could not think of availing a mobile with all these features a decade ago. But today the scenario is different. With so many mobile manufacturers showcasing their products, the market has an epidemic of mobile phones. Moreover, every year new telecom operators are launching their network and to increase their customer base they are offering lucrative combo packs where a customer gets a handset and a sim card together.

Mobile shopping has also gained popularity because of new innovative handsets showing new features like touchscreen, digital music, digital camera, wi-fi connectivity and so on. Then online shopping network has made mobile shopping even better. One can choose from a wide range of products sitting at home by just surfing the internet. It gives the customer the liberty to choose the latest version of exclusive brands. The websites offering online shopping portals market the products of well known mobile handset manufacturers.

The popularity of mobile shopping is also due to mass usage. Phones have become a one stop solution for all sort of communication. It has become a communicator. Moreover it is the only commodity that is kept with a person all throughout the day. A person talks, messages, listens to music, takes picture and can send it as well. In upgraded versions one can check his mail and search the internet. This increasing obsession and dependency on this gadget has made its shopping even more popular.

Then the high class society has taken up mobile shopping for fashion and social status. Possessing new handsets with new features proves how tech savvy you are. Thereafter, a lot of business class people and professionals are using multiple handsets for their multiple connections.

The penetration of mobile network has miles to go and with every baby step the companies are taking, the popularity is increasing by tenfold.

Smart Shopping For Evening Dresses

How do you know if a dress is really worth buying no matter how expensive it is? Aside from the quality, you need to determine what kind of dress it is. Even if a dress is affordable, you won’t buy it either if you don’t think it’s worth wearing.

Shopping for evening dresses requires careful selection. You would want to make sure that you are making a good investment for your wardrobe. You may want to determine first whether it is really a functional dress or not. Do you think you can wear this on almost every special occasion that you’re about to attend? The price is the vital factor that will determine its worth. Aside from the quality of the fabric, it is the nature of dress itself. Not all of night dresses are versatile, because some women are choosy with their style.

Go for evening dresses that are still classic, elegant, and stylish. Don’t go for trendy clothing for they will just run out of fashion. Consider the design and the color of the dress. Classic styles are worthy of wearing for almost all occasions for it fits anywhere. Unlike the trendy ones, they will be a part of wardrobe’s collection. Petite dresses are trendy nowadays yet you can find its style in a classic version. Find a cheap dress that you don’t need to alter just to fit on occasion or suit on the new demands of trends.

You don’t need to get confused when choosing a worthy evening dress, in spite of an overwhelming number of selections. Once you determine its style, function, and versatility, you can stick on these criteria and choose the best dress that you can ever buy aside from its price and design. And don’t forget that it is capable of enhancing your looks and give you a good boost of self-confidence.

Low Interest Personal Loans – Unsecured?

Low-interest personal loans, also known as signature loans, can often be quite difficult to qualify for. Low-interest personal loans are granted to the borrower without the lender enjoying the benefit of collateral which is why they are often called unsecured loans. It is for this reason that borrowers will find that lenders’ guidelines for such loans are often significantly more stringent.

Since no collateral is offered, as opposed to a home equity or auto loans, the lender’s only recourse in the event of default is to file a lawsuit. While it is certainly within reason that the lender could be awarded some personal property or wage garnishment as a result of a lawsuit, this is generally not the case.

In jurisdictions where wage garnishments are permitted, they are generally reserved for cases involving child support payments. As lenders find themselves financially exposed with low-interest personal loans, they will often require that the borrower has a requisite level of financial stability and credit in order to consider granting them.

The underwriting guidelines as regards low-interest personal loans will vary from lending institution to lending institution. In the case where there is a pre-existing personal relationship between the lending institution and the potential borrower, the qualification criteria will often be quite a bit more lenient.

While this is often the case, the lending institution is certainly under no obligation to make any exceptions as regards their guidelines. The parameters that lending institutions will use in order to determine whether a borrower is qualified for a low-interest personal loan are solid financial assets, job longevity, good credit rating and a low debt to income ratio.

The size of the personal loan that most lending institutions are willing to offer are often limited, sometimes to as low as $5,000. While some may offer more, it is important to remember that low-interest personal loans are often quite difficult to receive approval for. In the case of a potential borrower with less than perfect credit, they will find that the opportunity for them to receive approval for a low-interest personal loan is limited to say the least.

The situation is necessarily as dire as one might believe for borrowers seeking a loan with less than perfect credit. There are countless finance companies that specialize in smaller loans for just such borrowers. While borrowers may succeed in obtaining a loan through these finance companies, they will find that the interest rates that they are offered are often as much as 10% above market interest rates and can be paid off over a one to two year period. It is highly recommended that borrowers do their due diligence as regards researching their available alternatives.

There is another option for borrowers with poor credit, cash advance loans. Cash advance loans are also know as fast cash and payday loans; they require no credit check and, as such, the borrowers credit history is of no consequence. Cash advance loans are high-risk and, subsequently, have high interest rates and are designed to help borrowers solve immediate cash-flow problems.

It is important to remember that there are financial institutions that are more flexible than others and more open to work with a borrowers of all credit ratings. In certain cases, borrowers with poor credit may find that they can obtain a loan for up to $20,000. Of course, unsecured personal loans are obtainable by almost everyone for virtually any situation.

While unsecured loans with low-interest are not easy to come by, there are alternatives available for borrowers with a less than stable financial standing. Again, with some research and by learning what is available, one should be able to find loan package that meets their needs.

Enjoy your Devon holiday in a luxury cottage

The charming county of Devon is the ideal place to spend a vacation, whether it is a weekend getaway for a couple, family or friends. The wealth of diversity offered in Devon is unrivalled in England – there is so much to do here whether you wish to ramble through nature’s creations or indulge in more active sport. The list of attractions in Devon is endless, which is why visitors can never get enough of the place, and return to Devon time after time.

If you are a beach and water sports fanatic, Devon is ideal for you. There are so many beaches to list, but here are a few. Blackpool Sands has a Blue Flag award for cleanliness and provides breathtaking views; Slapton Sands has a great car park and is dog friendly; Bantham Beach is one of the best sandy beaches in Devon and is perfect for sandcastle making.

Devon also has several famous Rivers – River Dart is one of the most popular and is referred to as the ‘most beautiful river in England’. Here you can enjoy fishing and the scenery while going on a boat ride. There are numerous sporting activities for enthusiasts in Devon – the most popular include fishing, horse riding and golf.

If you prefer visiting historic towns and sites, then Devon has so much in store for you. Historic towns include Totnes, Ashburton, Dartmouth, Salcombe, Exeter and Plymouth to name a few. These towns have fascinating old buildings, houses, castles and gardens. Some of the most visited properties in Devon include Dartington Hall, Buckland Abbey, Castle Drogo, RHS Rosemoor Gardens and Saltram House.

There are several types of accommodation available in Devon.

From hotels to cottages, bed and breakfast establishments to apartments, camping to caravans, the options are numerous. A stay in a luxury cottage in Devon is one of the many ways that one can enjoy Devon, and guarantees that your holiday will be perfect.

Self catering luxury cottages in Devon are ideally located either close to the coast or else in the beautiful countryside. Either way, you can enjoy Devon in style. Cottages come with bedrooms and bathrooms which are comfortable and well equipped and come complete with kitchen, living room and dining room furniture. Typical luxury cottages in Devon come with several facilities such as TV/DVD players, washer/dryer, full cooker, fridge, freezer, dishwasher, garden furniture and sun umbrellas.

Publishing Industry Jobs

As recently as five to seven years ago, careers in the publishing industry were actually limited because of the small number of existing publishing houses, and the majority of those have been privately owned for generations and remain so today. However, many opportunities exist in the publishing industry because of the new innovative technology that has arisen out of the Internet.

Probably the most obvious job within the publishing industry is that of an author. The second most well known or recognized job outside of the publishing industry is that of a literary agent, and the third is editor.

Authors write the material or texts that are to be published. They submit their work to literary agents who forward the work onto the editors of publishing companies. Sometimes authors will forward their work directly onto the editor, foregoing the agent who will take a percentage cut of the author’s paycheck.

If the author is really lucky, the editor will call him directly with a job.

One of the problems is letting go of out-dated thinking and processes. While some places may have a ‘top-down’ problem, others have leadership that actually do think in terms of the 21st century and new media opportunities. But they are most likely the exception. Part of the problem is one of a slow-to-change work culture.

There are many (great) veteran editors and sales people in publishing companies near and far that have held on tightly to the same way of doing things; editors used to only have to work on a print version of a magazine and sales made fairly easy commissions on recurring print advertising. Now editors frequently have several outlets to satisfy (print, web, podcast interviews, webcasts and, yes, videos) while sales people have to sell sponsorships for these new content vehicles. Sales people also need to understand these new technologies to convincingly sell them.

Thepeople working in desktop publishing use a computer software in order to produce and format publication material. They basically use numbers, text and data to prepare the publication material. The publication material can range from newsletters, newspapers to magazines and books.

There is a huge demand for people in the desktop publishing industry. In fact the statistics show that about 4 out of 10 desktop publishing professionals work in various newspapers, books, periodicals and directories. Every 1 professional out of 4 work in the printing industry and other related activities.

The statistics also show that employment figures are also expected to grow faster in the near future.The jobs are easily accessible for people with a certificate or degree. To receive a degree you can get a training from an accredited vocational school or college. The time that you’ll have to invest in order to get a certificate in desktop publishing is not much, in fact it in about a year, what it takes to get yourself a desktop publishing certificate.

There are other lesser known jobs in the publishing industry other than author, agent, editor, and publisher. One of these lesser known jobs is that of author publicist. The publicist takes the published book, the author, and puts together a public relations campaign that goes beyond simply marketing. If the author is a growing phenomenon, chances are that the publicist can be seen right beside the author during book tours.